Australia - Places of interests, attractions

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Autor: studak
Typ práce: Referát
Dátum: 07.02.2014
Jazyk: Angličtina
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Places of interests, attractions
National parks
There are more than 500 national parks and reservations in Australia. Some of them are placed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. The oldest is Royal Park, which is the second oldest national park in the world too. It is situated near Sydney. One of the most unique is Eungelaa on the west coast of Australia. The most beautiful and most visited is national park Wilsons Promontory which lies between Sydney and Melbourne. Interesting are also Croajingolong, Gippsland, Coorong, Myall Lakes, Ku-ring-gai, Chase, Kitchega, etc.

Kakadu national park
Kakadu National Park is located in the Northern Territory of Australia. The name Kakadu comes from the mispronunciation of ‘Gagudju’ which is the name of an Aboriginal language spoken in the northern part of the Park. Kakadu is ecologically and biologically diverse. Aboriginal people have occupied the Kakadu area continuously for at least 40,000 years. Kakadu National Park is renowned for the richness of its Aboriginal cultural sites. There are more than 5,000 recorded art sites illustrating Aboriginal culture over thousands of years. The archaeological sites demonstrate Aboriginal occupation for at least 20,000 and possibly up to 40,000 years. The cultural and natural values of Kakadu National Park were recognised internationally when the Park was placed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.   About half of the land in Kakadu is Aboriginal land under the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 and most of the remaining land is currently under claim by Aboriginal people. The areas of the Park that are owned by Aboriginal people are leased by the traditional owners to the Director of National Parks to be managed as a national park. The remaining area is Commonwealth land vested under the Director of National Parks. The Aboriginal traditional owners of the Park are descendants of various clan groups from the Kakadu area and have longstanding affiliations with this country. Their lifestyle has changed in recent years, but their traditional customs and beliefs remain very important. About 500 Aboriginal people live in the Park; many of them are traditional owners. All of Kakadu is jointly managed by Aboriginal traditional owners and the Australian Government’s Department of the Environment and Water Resources through a division known as Parks Australia.
 
The Devils Marbles
In the creation story of the Dreaming, the Rainbow Serpent fashioned the earth and then returned to a spot east of the Kimberleys at a place where the rainbow meets the earth. The Rainbow Serpent's eggs fossilised and became what non-Aborigines now call the Devils Marbles. The Aborigines know them as Karlukarlu.   Because of this, the Devils Marbles Conservation Reserve is a spiritually significant and sacred site to the Aborigines.

The Olgas – Kata Tjuta
The Olgas are located only 48 kilometres from Ayres Rock. The name for the Olgas is Kata Tjuta which means the place of many heads. You can stroll through the Valley of the Winds or Olga Gorge and catch a glimpse of some of the captivating creatures of the region, such as the Thorny Devil. The Sunset at the Olgas is spectacular, with dusky blues and purples to fierce oranges and reds that light up the sky. So if you can spend a few nights here so you can really witness the magnificent colours of the sunrise and sunset.

Alice Springs and surround

Stay in the famous outback town of Alice Springs, which sits in Australia’s red heart just 200 kilometres south of its geographic centre. From here you can bushwalk; four wheels drive or join a camel trek across the rolling sand dunes of the Simpson Desert. Trek through Ormiston Gorge and Pound, visit breathtaking Glen Helen Gorge and see rock wallabies at Simpsons Gap, all in the nearby East and West MacDonnell Ranges. Bike ride to Simpsons Gap at dawn, discover different Aboriginal art styles along the Tanami Track and explore the rock art, artefacts and ceremonial sites near the small Aboriginal community of St Teresa.

Cairns and the Great Barrier Reef
Base yourself in cosmopolitan Cairns and take a day trip to the World Heritage-listed Great Barrier Reef. Snorkel or dive in warm tropical water with rainbow coloured coral, sponges and fish. Or head to the magical, primeval Daintree Rainforest. Here you can cruise the Daintree River past birds, animals and crocodiles or cross it on a ferry to the four wheel drive country of Cape Tribulation.  See a performance by the world-famous Aboriginal dance theatre Tjapukai, then ride the Kuranda Scenic Railway to the rainforest village of Kuranda. Fish from tranquil Mission Beach, where the rainforest meets the reef, or sip cocktails in the vibrant resort town of Port Douglas. Pamper yourself in a Palm Cove spa or camp, fish and four wheel drive in the remote wilderness of Cape York Peninsula.  Explore the world's longest lava tube system in Undara Volcanic National Park and a 1930s Spanish-inspired castle in Paronella Park.

Brisbane

Bike ride in the City Botanic Gardens or cruise down the Brisbane River spotting pelicans. Laze next to the gardens and lagoons of South Bank or explore Fortitude Valley’s cafes and boutique shops.  For an adrenalin-pumping view of the city and its surrounds, you can do a bridge climb, abseil down Kangaroo Point Cliffs or coast over in a hot air balloon. On the clear waters and islands of nearby Moreton Bay, you can fish, boat, feed wild dolphins and toboggan down the world’s tallest sand dunes.

Gold Coast
Frolic on the sand or in the world-class nightclubs of Surfers Paradise. Then trek the World Heritage-listed rainforest of the Gold Coast hinterland, where you can swim in crystal-clear rock pools, explore rainforest retreats like Mount Tamborine and see Australia’s largest glow-worm colony.  Of course, you can’t miss the Gold Coast’s famous themed attractions. See dolphin and sea lion shows at Sea World, ride the world’s tallest and fastest thrill rides at Dreamworld or jump in a giant wavepool at Wet 'n' Wild Water Park.

Sydney

Soak up the city’s gorgeous harbour, seductive outdoor lifestyle and great natural beauty. Kayak under the Sydney Harbour Bridge or wave at the Opera House as you ride a ferry across the harbour to Manly. Learn to surf at Bondi Beach or swim in the calm waters of Coogee. Lose yourself in the cobblestone cul-de-sacs of The Rocks or in the markets, boutiques, cafes and pubs of Paddington. As well as a world-famous harbour and more than 70 sparkling beaches, Sydney offers fabulous food, festivals and 24-7 fun. You’ll soon agree there’s no place in the world like Sydney.

Sydney surrounds
Listen to jazz amongst the vines in the Hunter Valley, bush walk in the Blue Mountains or float down the Hawkesbury River on a houseboat. Watch dolphins from Port Stephens and Forster and lose yourself in the World Heritage-listed wilderness of Barrington Tops. Escape to the hills, forests, valleys and heritage villages of the Southern Highlands. Surf on the Central Coast or on the South Coast, where you can also see Kiama’s famous blowhole. These mountains, rivers, beaches, parks and rich tablelands are just a short drive from Sydney’s fringes.

Snowy Mountains

Hit Australia’s highest ski slopes at Charlotte Pass and climb Mt Kosciuszko, Australia’s tallest peak. At the top you’ll find a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve with 20 species of plants found nowhere else in the world. In winter, carve up the snow at fields such as Thredbo and Perisher Blue. In summer, take in the trout-filled streams and wildflower-coated plains going cycling, caving, rafting, kayaking, four wheel driving, horse riding and hiking. Whatever the season, the Snowy Mountains has endless opportunities for outdoor adventure.

Melbourne
Sitting on the Yarra River at Port Phillip Bay, this stylish, vibrant city is a maze of hidden laneways, opulent bars, exclusive restaurants and off-the-beaten-track boutiques. Visit Federation Square, the city’s landmark cultural space, and enjoy a sunset beer on the St Kilda promenade. Shop till you drop on funky Brunswick Street or upmarket Chapel Street. Wander Southbank’s cafes, bistros and bars and get a world tour of cuisines in Carlton, Richmond and Fitzroy. Take an Aboriginal Heritage Walk through the Royal Botanic Gardens and cheer with a capacity crowd at the Melbourne Cricket Ground.

Yarra Valley and Dandenong Ranges

Stay in Yarra Glen, the heart of the food and wine region and tour the acclaimed wineries of the Yarra Valley. Trek through the tall forests of the Dandenong Ranges National Park. You can stop amidst the fairytale mists of Sherbrooke Forest or take the Puffing Billy Steam Railway through the villages of Belgrave, Gembrook and Emerald. Visit the famous Healesville wildlife sanctuary and wander the gardens, waterfalls and forest of Marysville, also a gateway to the Lake Mountain ski fields.

Great Ocean Road

Discover beaches, bushland and kangaroos at Anglesea and see epic waves crash on Bells Beach, near the surfing town of Torquay. Swim, surf and fish in Lorne and walk through the waterfalls and lush rainforest of the nearby Otway Ranges. You can stand on Shipwreck Coast and marvel at the craggy limestone stacks of the Twelve Apostles in Port Campbell National Park. Sea kayak and surf in idyllic Apollo Bay and watch whales from Warrnambool. You’ll find fishing and an annual folk festival in historic Port Fairy.

High Country
Ski or snowboard at Mount Hotham, Australia’s powder capital, or on the steep slopes of the winter playground of Falls Creek. Tackle winter sports, biking or four wheel driving at Mount Buller and marvel at Mount Buffalo’s unique granite beauty. Visit wineries fringed by gum trees in Rutherglen and see the courthouse where Ned Kelly stood trial in the historic gold rush town of Beechworth. Go fishing, houseboating and waterskiing at Lake Eildon. Or base yourself in Bright for walking, cycling and easy access to snowfields and gourmet delights.

The Murray

 Visit the home of paddle-steamers in Echuca-Moama and explore the pioneer history of Swan Hill. Indulge in fine food and wine amongst the citrus groves and vineyards of the vibrant outback oasis of Mildura. In the twin river towns of Yarrawonga-Mulwala, you can camp, bushwalk, play a round of golf, or fish and water ski on the local lakes and rivers.

Adelaide
 Admire the elegant colonial architecture and browse museums and libraries along North Terrace. Shop up a storm at Rundle Mall or sample the fresh produce from Adelaide Central Market. Embrace the alfresco ambience of Rundle Street in the East End or explore the exotic, bustling foodhalls of Chinatown. Swim with dolphins in vibrant Glenelg and fish from the jetty in Henley. Bike ride in Elder Park and row past rose gardens in Rymill Park. Picnic in sprawling Botanic Park, where the international music festival WOMADelaide is held. Explore the museums, markets and historic harbour of Port Adelaide or see heritage buildings and colourful summer sideshows in family-friendly Semaphore. Browse the world's largest collection of Aboriginal antiquities at the Aboriginal Cultures Gallery or do a cultural tour of Adelaide Botanic Gardens with a local Kaurna guide.

Barossa

Visit world-famous vineyards such as Yalumba, Seppelts, Penfolds and Two Hands and sample quality, local produce on the Butcher, Baker, WineMaker Trail. In the nearby heritage town of Gawler, you’ll find stone churches, galleries and museums set against rolling hills and manicured vineyards. Take a tour of historic wineries and boutique breweries. See artisans at work in one of the many studios or buy some of the region’s famous handicrafts. Of course, nothing beats a long lunch under the gum trees with a bottle of one of the region’s flagship wines, Barossa Shiraz or Eden Valley Riesling.

Clare Valley
Walk or cycle the 25-kilometre Riesling Trail between vineyards and restaurants, past green hills, churches and classic stone buildings. Taste sacramental wine made by Jesuit priests at the cellar door in Sevenhill. Drive the Heartland Heritage Trail to lovingly restored heritage towns such as Burra, Kapunda and Mintaro, where you can tour the stately Georgian mansion of Martindale Hall. Learn about the region’s pastoral history with a stay at Bungaree Station in Clare. Explore the Aboriginal history of Two Wells or see old steam trains in Gawler, South Australia’s oldest country town. Explore the restaurants, cafes and pubs of the gourmet haven of Auburn.  Buy country produce from the colourful markets in Sevenhill or take a cooking course at Thorn Park.

Perth and surrounds
Cruise the Swan River past parks and skyscrapers to 40 vineyards in the Swan Valley or the Perth Zoo. Visit Rottnest Island, where you can explore history, bike ride to secret beaches and kayak to secluded bays. Feast on seafood and soak up the carnival atmosphere in historic Fremantle. Discover the lookouts, landscaped gardens and Aboriginal heritage of huge Kings Park. Swim, surf, fish, windsurf and sail on clean and uncrowded beaches such as Cottlesloe or Scarborough. Then skip between the sunny boardwalks, beaches and marinas of the Sunset Coast.
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